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Juvenile Justice

Juvenile Arrests in Wisconsin

The number of arrests of people age 17 and under has dropped sharply in Wisconsin in recent years. The decrease reflects a drop in crime committed by juveniles, as well as changes in law enforcement practices.

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The State of Juvenile Justice in Wisconsin

This report is an update of an earlier 2015 report and includes data through 2015. Fortunately, many of the trends noted in the prior reports have continued, as juvenile arrests have continued to decline and there has been a growth in support for successful community-based programs. Read the full report here.

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Risking Their Futures

This is a 2008 WCCF publication outlining why 17 year olds should not be charged as adults, including a review of some of the collateral consequences of youth getting an adult arrest and/or court record. Although the numbers have changed, the basic content of this report informs our on-going efforts to raise the age of […]

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Wraparound’s Recipe for Success

What makes wraparound and other systems of care approaches different than traditional service delivery systems?  What makes them both a challenge to implement in traditional bureaucracies?  WCCF’s, Wraparounds Recipe for Success,  highlights some of the lesser discussed system reforms and implementation strategies that make a wraparound/systems of care approach different than implementing traditional services and […]

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Continuing Trends in Juvenile Justice in Wisconsin

This report is an update of prior reports and includes data up through 2014. Many of the trends noted in the earlier report have continued, as juvenile arrests have continued to decline and we have seen a growth in support for successful community-based programs.

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Returning 17-Year-Olds to the Juvenile Justice System: Reducing Crime and Saving Money

Objective: To return jurisdiction over first-time, non-violent 17-year-old offenders to the juvenile court, making our communities safer and resulting in substantial savings from reduced costs of law enforcement, court processing, and losses to victims. Background: With the adoption of the Juvenile Code in 1996, the age of adult court jurisdiction was lowered to age 17 […]

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A Light at the End of a Long Tunnel for JJDPA Reauthorization?

You may recall that Sen. Whitehouse and Sen. Grassley introduced a bill to reauthorize the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) late in the last congressional session. But, clearly Sen. Grassley, now in the majority, is being a leading voice in promoting JJDPA reauthorization, on a strong bi-partisan basis, in the new Congress. Changes […]

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